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What if I want to add a Plug or Switch after I move in my home.

NOT A PROBLEM AT ALL; IN FACT, ADDING HIGH OR LOW VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL OUTLETS AFTER CONSTRUCTION IS MUCH EASIER TO INSTALL THAN CONVENTIONAL CONSTRUCTION APPLICATIONS: Here is why...


A brief description of the wall system is needed to understand how electrical and plumbing are installed during and after construction. Omnicrete is a “tri-wall” construction system; some think of it as a “sandwiched” wall system. The center component is a solid monolithic, poured in place concrete core which is the structural component of the entire wall system. This solid core is “sandwiched” between two Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) walls on either side of the core. The “means and methods” of actual assembly on the job site is delineated elsewhere in our reports and not covered here since it is not the focus of this question. Suffice it to say, the finished wall system incorporates 4 inches AAC on either side. That being said, let’s now understand the basic facts about this amazing material called Autoclaved Aerated Concrete commonly known as AAC.

During its manufacturing, Autoclaved Aerated Concrete is mixed and cast in forms; several chemical reactions take place that give AAC its light weight (20% – 30% of the weight of concrete) and thermal properties. Aluminum powder reacts with calcium hydroxide and water to form hydrogen. The hydrogen gas foams and doubles the volume of the raw mix (creating gas bubbles up to 3mm [⅛ inch] in diameter). At the end of the foaming process, the hydrogen escapes into the atmosphere and is replaced by air.

When the forms are removed from the material, it is solid but still soft. It is then cut into either blocks or panels, and placed in an autoclave chamber for 12 hours under steam pressure. During this steam pressure hardening process, when the temperature reaches 190° Celsius (374° Fahrenheit) and the pressure reaches 8 to 12 bars, quartz sand reacts with calcium hydroxide to form calcium silica hydrate, which gives AAC its high strength (but not as strong as regular concrete) and other unique properties. After the autoclaving process, the material is ready for immediate use on the construction site. Depending on its density, up to 80% of the volume of an AAC block is air. AAC’s low density also accounts for its low structural compression strength. It can carry loads of up to 8 MPa (1,160 PSI), approximately 40% to 50% of the compressive strength of regular concrete. However, when AAC is used as a component of the Omnicrete wall system its deficient structural strength is irrelevant, since the Omnicrete system relies on the solid monolithic center core as the main structural component of the entire wall system. The center core of the Omnicrete wall system alone is stronger than any other wall system currently being used due to its monolithic nature. All other walls systems

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